Dating fender solid state amps

There were a few models with a tube phase splitter in them, but for the most part Music Man amplifiers used the faster responding common Grid, Cathode Coupled drive from a solid state front end that players characterized as "loud as hell". 15 of the 28 pages from 1976 catalogue were dedicated to amplification.

In 1975, Fender's legal restriction had expired and after a vote of the board he was named the president of Music Man. He also owned and ran a consulting firm called CLF Research (Clarence Leo Fender) in Fullerton, California.

Below: A mint early 1960’s Airline with original case. It is owned by a friend of mine that brought it over last week to tease me! Fortunately he agreed to let me share some pictures with you.

The Music Man story began in 1971 when Forrest White and Tom Walker formed a company they would call Tri-Sonix, Inc (often incorrectly referred to as "Tri-Sonic").

Below: One last Teisco, a Mosrite Joe Maphis copy, which was also the inspiration for the Eastwood Sidejack Series. I must say that this is perhaps one of the coolest guitars I have. Below: A few more Guyatones, the second one has a set neck, may be from the late fifties. Another 2015 Eastwood Custom Shop project was the Guyatone LG-50. Below: Another of my favorite designs, the EKO 700, in two models, 4V and 3V. According to my neighbor, one of the best playing guitars in the entire collection, the single pickup 1967 Red Cobra. Below: According to me, one of the best playing guitars in the collection, the Goya Rangemaster. As is the beautiful Red Galanti and the Espana 335. The GL Rangemaster is another outstanding Italian guitar. Then, the ever-popular but VERY hard to find 1967 Teisco May Queen.

Then, a couple of Italian masterpieces: The Cobra is one of a dozen or so NOS guitars that I picked up when the Milwaukee connection flushed their last holdings. Below: Far left is a guitar I lust after, but have never owned. Eastwood makes an excellent Phase IV replica that is far better than the original. Next to that is a “Montclair” Burns copy, just like the Hi-Lo pictured earlier. Lastly is a token Airline Bass with a white Gumby headstock. (You can find a nice May Queen re-issue on the 1990 page and another recent Eastwood Custom Shop model here). The timeless Teisco ET460 Del Ray and a simple Sekova Bison.

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These instruments were designed by Leo Fender and Forrest White.Below: If your first electric guitar was in the 1960’s, there is a good chance it was a Teisco. The Teisco Del Ray was perhaps the most popular student guitar from the 1960’s. It was recently re-issued through the Eastwood Custom Shop. Hagstrom made some wonderful guitars with exceptionally fast necks.No wonder guitars became so popular in the sixties, would you rather be playing a Teisco Del Ray or an accordion? The Regent is from Canada, the name Regent was a Canadian label for GUYATONE. Next to it is an inexpensive Prestige Mosrite copy. The greenburst is a Kawai and then a single pickup version of the Domino Baron.Leo Fender did not like the name Tri-Sonix, so the name evolved under Leo Fender's suggestion to call the new company Music Man.In 1974, the company started producing its first product, an amplifier designed by Leo Fender and Tom Walker called the "Sixty Five".Interesting because it as an indiviual slider volume for each pickup, so you can dial in an unlimited variety of tones. An early 1960’s Vivona which was made by EKO, and a wee Hi-Tone. It is from Italy, and looks, feels, smells, just like the JG Italians. Below: On the left is a RARE Wandre Doris from the mid 1960’s. Next is a nice ’67 Fender Jaguar and the ’67 Domino Spartan, costing about 7000% less. ) Though nothing really beats the mojo of owning a true, vintage instrument, at least Eastwood have, over the past decade, done a great job at bringing back some of those gems, as mentioned before.Lastly, an EKO Florentine Bass with it’s partner 6-string. The Airline Guitars were sold through Montgomery Ward.Below: Perhaps my favorite 1960’s guitars, the Domino’s.The Galanti, on the other hand, is quite a rare bird. I found it in a shop in San Diego but they were asking around 00 for it. Next to that are a couple of Norma’s and another attempt at copying the Burns pickguard. Next to that is a Hi-Lo (also available from Ibanez). Below: As you can see, we got our walls painted the other day, hope you like it! This baby looks, feels, plays like no other Bass from its time.I found the one next to it on EBAY – in a severe state of dsrepair – for 0. Below: One last entry level Norma, then a totally cool EKO Florentine. It is a semi-hollow that looks like a cross between an SG and a 335. The funniest review I have ever read on Harmony central was about a Hi-Lo guitar. REALLY well made, big and heavy (the picture scale looks small but this is bigger than a Fender Precision). Eastwood has been making some excellent re-issue versions of this in fretless EUB-1 and fretted EEB-1 versions.

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